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20110701
20110731
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 25
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
in afghanistan >> ah, yes. and that is a very important part of "the haunting legacy" because chapter 3 with carter and really right up through with reagan and bush one, vietnam and afghanistan have been sort of intellectually married and why do i say that? because zbigniew brzezinski whom you know very well and has undoubtedly many on this program many times, brzezinski when he wasnational security advisor to prident carter, we were very fortunate. we got ahold of hisecret wall streeting memos to carter about what he thought carter ought to do in foreign policy. zbigniew brzezinski actually had in his mind that if we could suck the russians in more deeply into afghanistan we could create what he called heir vietnam." and in his mind, that kind of a loss, soviet troops in humiliation, having to leave afghanistan to go back to the soviet union loaded up with drugs, terrible shape, the equipment absolutely destroyed, they went back and in spig's mind, this could lead to the disintegration of the communist power in the soviet union because the red ar is the core the strength, the inner str
day of his visit to afghanistan, for nato's silk -- for nato soldiers were killed. which all begs -- which all begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? >> british troops drop in. it's an area the taliban used to control. no longer. nato is pushing out. that is what you can do when 10,000 british troops have been reinforced by 20,000 americans. so far, the british soldiers have not run into any opposition. usually when the insurgents see nato coming in strength, they retreat. but not always. so no one takes any chances. afghan police lead the searches. nato believes afghan candy -- afghans can deal with their own people better than foreign troops. by 2015, the idea is they will do it alone. one of the villagers hope things will improve without the insurgents around. >> the taliban steals food. i'm very poor. if i protest, they say you support nato. >> this is what progress lookalike in afghanistan. so much so, there is to be a further cut in british troops with a few hundred soldiers. but native troops still far outnumber the afghan troops. what is needed to ha
the thdrawal in afghanistan to u.s. relationships with china. the los angeles angels of anaheim has written apart from the firs family there may b no one who spends more time than donilon. as the u.s. faces economic challenges at home and rapid changes abroad with an arab spring, the white houshas made its mission to restore american prestige and influence and power around the world. i'm pleased t have tom donilon at this table for the first time welcome. >> thank you, charlie, great to be here. good to see you. >> rose: there's so much to talk about in limited time. we could spend 30 minutes just talking about your biography and your friendship with warren christopher, the clinton administration, all of that. you combine policy and politics in earlier careers and now it's the focus of the united states and its relationship with the world. how do you view the mission? because you said you wanted to restore america's credibility, its influence, its respect, and its power. >> well, i think that's exactly right, and that is our core goal at this point. we came into office in 2009 after a diffi
president obama will announce how many troo will bring home from afghanistan beginning next month. the announcement follows months of debate in the white house, it comes with increasing concern in the war andure role in the country. the administration fac a number of challenges at home. unemployment remains high at 9.1%. the housing market continues to suffer and the u.s. debt has surpassed 14 trillion dollars. all of this will pose a significant challenge for the president in the 2012 eltion. joining me now a group of comments from the new york time from washington david brooks, with me here in new york, david leonhardt, roger cohen and tom friedman. they have all won too many awards to talk about. mi pleased to have all of them on this program today to talk about america. what's the challenge for us? because wherever i go around the world the thing they say is tt we want america to take care of their business at home first, so that they can lead the world and pla an important part as the rest of the world changes. >> well, charlie, i think the world does understan that america p
are investigating the case of james phillips and, killed in afghanistan. according to his father, e-mail messages he received after his death had been read. he suspects, by hackers. >> they should suffer whatever punishment is appropriate. i'm sure that will happen. it is going to take time. >> rebecca brooks, picture leading news international tonight. criminal investigation, public inquiries. the scrutiny of what went on at her newspaper could continue for years. >> for more on today's news, i'm joined from london by author and journalist peter preston who was the editor of the guardian for a number of years. if i could start, could you explain to viewers around the world and here in the united states just how big a deal this story is and the latest developments art? >> it was all about celebrities. it was difficult to get the public engaged in that. this week, when it was revealed that the telephone of the 13- year-old murder victim had been packed into and a whole variety of other car stories -- hacked into, and a whole variety of other horror stories emerged, now you have a toxic image for the
, from afghanistan and from iraq. you have some other defense cuts can, you have a whole bunch of discretionary cuts. you do some little things on mandatory programs that are not social security or medicare. and so then the deal gets done and some ofhese big questions on medicare and taxes get saved for the 2012 campaign. on the other hand, whenou read quotes which you occasionally read, from congressional staffers, republican staff are saying, you know, ybe a showdown in whiche don't get this deal isn't the worst thing. that does make you wonder how many people within congress think that actually no deal would be better than a deal. and my colleague david brooks argues that that would be very bad for the republicans politically. i'm not so sure about that. there is only one president and there's only one ecomy and i think there's a chance that chaos and no deal actually hurts the white house and to the extent that the republicans agree with that, then we could be in for a really dicey couple of months. >> rose: thank you, david. >> thank you >> rose: we'll be right back. stay
access to education and also train teachers? but i've spent time in afghanistan and iraq which represent very challenging problems for children when you look at the mortality rates for children under the age of 5. i just came back from ethiopia where we have a longstanding large program, very close collaboration with the government of ethiopia in supporting both community healthcare initiatives as well as education. >> but anne mulcahy wants people to realize you don't have to be a c.e.o. to help. >> if you log on to goodgoes.org you will see a set of straightforward simple ways you can make a difference. whether it is a $10 care package for a newborn and mother or a very modest investment to fund the community health worker that can touch many, many lives and have a broader impact or simply passing on the challenge and creating more awareness within communities about what can be done and how you can personally touch and impact you know the lives of children. >> well, by way of full disclosure, i should say i do a great deal of work with anne mulcahy as a trustee of save the children and
important than the sergeant in afghanistan? that's a tough decision to make. those are the kinds of choices that have to be made, the kind of contingency plans that the treasury is mapping out today. it really terribly dangerous. >> let me ask you, before i turn to bigger issues, what are the political consequences for the president, for the speaker of the house, and for those republicans who are taking a hard-line in the house of representatives? >> well, i mean, i think the president believes that because public opinion is more on his side than on the republican de, particularly on the shape of a big plan or who has been less willing to compromise, that they feel that almost any outcome is likely to be beneficial to the president politically. i think that when he went on the tv on monday night, his speech was aimed at the independence that the white house is -- independents that the white house is so focused on to convince them he's the reasonable player in this. i'm not sure that that's necessarily the case when we come out of this that he'll benefit politically. i think everybody could
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)